GymBug

I've caught it. Fortunately, it's not treatable.

Archive for the tag “educational”

Documentaries; Odd Source of Motivation?

Hi there!

Weekend is almost over but fear not I have developed a list of educational health, related documentaries for you to look forward to watching next weekend (or to fill your relaxing Sunday)! Yaay for educational activities! Okay, you probably think I’m really sad but these documentaries are actually really interesting and they really opened my eyes up to different health concerns, food production issues and other things. If you have a chance to watch them I recommend doing so! It’s really is interesting and motivational. You may find some of these have you changing what you eat, how you eat, how you view food and how you view the media’s view of “perfect and healthy”. Click on the titles of each movies to see the trailer.

  • Food, Inc; this is about the food production industry and is really interesting (and at times a little upsetting). It’s all about the multinational corporate control of food production and how profit seeking has led to poor health standards and treatment of animals and workers.
  • Fork Over Knives; this is about how degenerative diseases can be controlled (and in some cases reversed) by changing what we eat. The focus of this documentary is rejecting our current go-to diets of meat and processed foods.
  • Food Matters; this is about mass food production making the world sicker and how the constant promotion of “healthy foods” that are actually pumped full of very harmful chemicals.
  • Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead; this follows one man’s journey to regaining his health. Joe Cross (our overweight, sick man in question) not only devotes himself to a 30 day diet of fruit and vegetable juices, he interviews over 500 Americans about food and eating habits. There’s also a special bond created between the main man and someone who shares the same illness as him.
  • I Want To Look Like That Guy; one man’s journey to getting those “magazine perfect” abs. This is great insight into the intense dedication required to get the types of bodies our media (unfortunately) perpetuates as being perfect. It’s an eye-opener and helped me accept that my own limits. However, make sure to read around it, there is some speculation as to the time-frame with this one. None the less, an interesting watch.
  • Bigger, Stronger, Faster; a more intense look into the world of bodybuilding and the unfortunate high use of steroids. It looks at the pressures of making it in the industry. It’s interesting to see how intense it is and the dangers of taking it too far.
  • Supersize Me; we’ve all heard of this one but it took me a long time to watch it. It was not pleasant but very interesting and McDonalds has never been the same for me! It’s a must-see if you’re going to make your way through this list (just don’t eat when watching).

There we have it! This list is not exhaustive; you can find heaps of documentaries related to health and fitness all over the web. I enjoy looking through Films For Action, they have some great ones. They also have a huge variety, so you can find any type of educational or informative movie or documentary for any interest!

Hope you had a great weekend!

Gym Bug

Advertisements

Heavy v Light; Which weight wins?

Hi there!

Today was weights day and it’s not been an excellent week in terms of recovery and my ability to push myself (I’m sure there may be others who experience this from time to time) and when I was doing my weights training I started thinking about the debate of what’s better; heavy weights, fewer repetitions or light weights, more repetitions?

The common thread for this debate really divides women and men in terms of how they lift. Men will pump iron using the heaviest (and sometimes more) weights they can lift, where as women will opt for the lower weight and more repetitions to avoid ‘getting bulky’. Firstly, this myth needs dispelled, lifting won’t make women super bulky on its own, we simply do not have enough testosterone to bulk like men.

In order to get long, lean muscles you need to reduce fat. Lifting heavier weights will increase muscle mass compared to fat in the body, which will boost your metabolism and lead to an even faster fat loss. So lifting heavy can help women because toned and lean because it helps burn fat.
However, some studies, as summarised in Huffington Post, states that you can do either type of weight training and essentially see the same results! Which means you can go for your heavy (85-90% of your max weight) for 8-10 reps or go light (40-50% of your max weight) for 10-15 reps and still see similar results by the end of a set period! Womenshealth Mag and Building Muscle 101 also discuss this and argue the same.

What they also say however is that you must lift heavy enough to cause muscle fatigue. If you do bicep curls for 30 reps and there’s no burn or exertion required you’re lifting too light and you won’t see a difference. There needs to be some form of muscle fatigue occuring. You also need to be improving week on week to see a difference. For example, when I started at this gym here in Madrid, I was using the bicep curl at 10 x 15kg, I’m now at 10 x 25kg. That has taken me roughly 9 weeks of 3 weights sessions a week, but I progressed. Sometimes, I would only be able to increase the weight by one set, then drop it for the final two, but I increased it when I could. This is key to see improvement and toning. Hoever, you can improve using other methods too;

  • Lift the same weight but with more repetitions within the same time frame and rest times
  • Go for the same amount of repetitions but a heavier weight using the same rest period (but you can extend the overall time taken)
  • Lift the same weight with the same repetitions but reduce the time frame and rest times

I would recommend mixing these up to prevent it getting boring. It’s a good way also to challenge yourself. You won’t see change if you don’t face challenge.

Something els you can do is mix up your workouts between heavy sessions and light sessions. For one week, do a heavy weight session, lifting between 70-90% of your max weight for 8-10 reps. Then the following week reduce it to a light week, lifting 50-70% of your max weight for 10-15 reps. Again, this may help prevent repetitive strain, plateuing and down right boring-ness from creeping in to the workout. Also, studies have found it won’t affect your long-term gains! Win-win.

As always, watch technique. Lifting weights can incur serious injuries if done incorrectly. If you’re lifting and something hurts beyond the usual muscle burn stop immediately and try figure out why. Technique is key to avoiding injury here, don’t push it and do not use something you don’t know the technique for. This is especially true for free-weights.

Overall, I’m pleased I discovered this researchbecause my main struggle in the gym is accepting lifting lighter than last session or not doing a HIIT cardio everytime. I will elaborate in another post about the benefits of not doing HIIT every session. However, now armed with knowledge that if I need to drop the weight (for whatever reason) then I can increase the repetitions and I won’t be compromising my overall long term goals of lean, toned muscle mass.

Also, you may experience ‘bad workouts’. Remember, any workout is better than no workout at all!

Gym Bug

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post Navigation